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Seat Post Lube

Seat Post Lube

Ok, call me dumb, but I bought a Trek Travel 5200 six years ago and when I recently went to change my seat, the upper part of my seat post developed a hairline crack.  I went to take out the post but it was frozen.  I looked up the bicycling manual and tried penetrating oil and tapping, drilled a whole and tried to move it with leverage, finally cut it down and sawed it off with a hack saw (very carefully).  Oh I also tried heat, but was afraid of melting the carbon.  Anyway, I finally cut it out.

When I put in the Ritchey post, the instructions said put a good bit of grease on the stem before putting it in the seat tube.  I checked my old bike and the tube came out fairly easy, and guess what?  It was lubed.  So, a little grease could have saved me about 8 hours of labor and could save you some trouble too.

I know, everyone knows to lube the seat post, but I didn't and Trek didn't either.

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Re: Seat Post Lube

How do you like your Travel? - your thoughts?  I bought a 2007 ( it is a Madone 5.2), but find that I am not comfortable reaching or riding in the drops and when I am in the drops, cannot reach the brakes/shifters too well.  The bike seems to not be conducive for me to ride in a little more upright or comfortable position as well.  Been looking at a possible change, but haven't narrowed it down any.

Bill

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Re: Seat Post Lube

My bike fits me fine.  It is similar to the 5.2 but a lot depends on the geometry and the individual.  I am 5ft 10 and my bike is a 56 cm.  The best is to go to a bike shop with your bike and have them measure you and the bike.  It can be fixed with a different angle on the handle bar stem, different length, height of seat, position of seat on the stem etc.  Good luck.   I hope it works out for you.  Bruce

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Re: Seat Post Lube

Bruce,
I take it the frame is carbon but what was the seat post made of? Let me guess, aluminum?  The seizing was probably caused by corrosion by dissimilar materials i.e., carbon/metal, aluminum/steel, etc.  I've had that happen, but never on carbon/carbon.  How did you end up removing the rest of the post after cutting it out?  BTW I always lube the seat post.  I learned the hard way.
Gil

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Re: Seat Post Lube

I just researched the ways to properly install both carbon and aluminum seatposts on carbon and Ti frames. A carbon seatpost in a carbon frame requires carbon assembly paste to provide enough additional friction to keep the post from sliding up and down in the seat tube. Aluminum posts in either carbon or Ti frames should be installed with an anti-seizing compound like Park ASC-1. You can probably use ordinary grease like Park Polylube instead. When I recently bought a new Thomson seatpost the store mechanic was glad to put a dab of anti-seize on my frame.

It's a good idea to move your seatpost around a couple of times a year.

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Re: Seat Post Lube

I have a similar issue with seizing (CADD 9 alum/ carbon seatpost). I'm willing to sacrifice the seatpost but want to save the frame. Any ideas?

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Re: Seat Post Lube

Mike Harris wrote:

I have a similar issue with seizing (CADD 9 alum/ carbon seatpost). I'm willing to sacrifice the seatpost but want to save the frame. Any ideas?

Years ago I had this issue with my Litespeed Tuscany frame. My LBS ended up sending the frame with the stuck seatpost back to the manufacturer to get it unstuck. That was expensive....

Janet L. Goldstein, BBC Forums Moderator
goldstein.j.mail@gmail.com

Janet Goldstein
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Re: Seat Post Lube

Start with penetrating oil and let it sit overnight before trying to twist it off. Pick the bike up, turn it upside-down and tightly clamp the seatpost in a vise. Then use the bike frame as leverage to twist the seatpost out of the seat tube. This doesn't work all the time. You can repeat with additional shots of penetrating oil. If all else fails, you can cut the post out. Talk to a real bike mechanic, not this amateur, to find out the best tool to use for that purpose.

Some people talk about heating up the seat tube to loosen the post. That scares me with Aluminum and CF frames, not so scary on steel and Ti frames. You'll probably wreck the paint job in any case.

HTH

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Re: Seat Post Lube

I tried that route with the penerating oil and utilizing a vise. With a full carbon seat post head I would have broken it to get enough torque on the upside down frame turning it on the vise. I'll need to consult Larry Dieren (Champion Cycles). Thanks Janet for the mfg suggestion.
Mike

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Re: Seat Post Lube

You can also try cooling the seat tube (ice bag or frozen towels).  I worked for several years as an aircraft mechanic and cooling parts was an effective way to get them free from each other...

Myslím, že je ?cas, abych se létat.

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