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Mar-21-11 08:47 pm
Category: Social
Forum: Advocacy

No story but other clubs that got the award:

http://www.bikeleague.org/members/club/clubs_year.php

Russell Loy wrote:

I asked how he could be at fault if she turned right so close to him that he couldn't stop and then hit her car.  He replied that if he had hit the front panel that might be the case, but he hit the rear panel of the car...

My understanding is everyone has a duty not to hit things even if they are in the wrong. Take a case of a left turning vehicle that tuns in front of your CAR. If you hit the front side panel then it is fairly obvious that you did not have a chance to avoid but if you hit the rear panel you did have a chance to avoid as you could have turned more left to avoid.

This (might) makes some sense with cars and left turns but makes no sense with right turns across another lane of traffic as it is totally dependent on when to other car started to turn. And it makes less sense with cyclists and bike lanes. You could come to a complete stop but still be in the turning radius of the other vehicle and be struck by the side rear.   The other thing is there is 15' of car moving across 5' of bike lane, the average cyclists cannot turn right (parked cars) or left (the turning car) so all they have is the distance from where they are to where the car started turning (with an every decreasing space due to the cars turning radius.) State law says a bicycle must have brakes capable of stopping 15' at 10mph. So if the cyclists is just past the rear bumper (assuming braking at the same time as turning) he stands a chance of stopping and avoiding a crash otherwise the motorist has not finished passing and the rear side panel is probably the more likely crash point then the front because of where the drivers blind spot is. A requirement for a cyclists to hit the front side panel would require a driver to right hook a cyclists within a 7' window and only a 7' window. A foot off and the cyclists is hitting the rear side panel.

Or more simplistically: An aggressive driver cuts you off while you are driving your car so your front bumper hits their rear side panel. He signaled so he is not at fault and possibly you now are. This makes no sense!

Just to note Nate says the cyclist has not been charged.  http://www.bikebaltimore.org/thoughts-a … asnopoler/

My summary of relevant laws and proper police enforcement:
http://www.baltimorespokes.org/article. … 2162422963

From the Mayor's Bicycle Advisory Committee list serve:

This is not a memorial… it’s to be a gathering because of the crash involving Nathan Krasnopoler, to pray for a speedy and full It’s 5:30 Wednesday, 03/09/2011 at 39th Street and University.

Please spread the word

http://www.baltimorespokes.org/article. … 1191714786

"No charges or citations have or are likely to be filed against the driver of the vehicle, an 83-year-old woman, according to Police department spokesman Kevin Brown."

The Law:
§ 21-1209.(d) Yielding right-of-way.- Unless otherwise specified in this title, the driver of a vehicle shall yield the right-of-way to a person who is lawfully riding a bicycle, an EPAMD, or a motor scooter in a designated bike lane or shoulder if the driver of the vehicle is about to enter or cross the designated bike lane or shoulder.

"The man was riding his bike in a marked bike lane on West University Parkway at the intersection with West 39th Street when he was struck by a vehicle whose driver was attempting to turn right, according to Brown."


Our guidance (based on Maryland law) submitted to MVA for inclusion in the next Drivers' Handbook:

"Never make a right turn from a through lane immediately after passing a bike on a shoulder or bike lane. Doing so is as dangerous as turning right from the left lane after passing a car on your right, so stay behind the bicycle. Try to avoid any chance that a bicycle will be to your right or in your right blind spot when you turn right. Before starting a right turn, move as far to the right as practicable within the bike lane, shoulder, or right turn lane. "
http://www.baltimorespokes.org/article. … 6001608737

There is nothing reported that shows the driver followed this guidance.

And there Baltimore City's Cyclists Bill of Rights passed by City Council:
"3. Cyclists have the right to the full support of educated law enforcement."
http://www.baltimorespokes.org/article. … 0115142299

Police got the laws wrong in the Jack Yates case and again here, this has to stop!
http://www.baltimorespokes.org/article. … 2133743715

Write: mayor@baltimorecity.gov and let the Mayor know your thoughts.

-=Barry=-
BaltimoreSpokes.org

Netherlands Bike+Barge Tour - May 7-14, 2011

This tour is organized by the Baltimore-Rotterdam Sister City Committee, an all-volunteer organization affiliated with the Baltimore Mayor's Office.

Bike through the countryside and picturesque towns with an English-speaking tour guide. Sleep on a river barge at night. The biking pace is moderate/casual - 25-30 miles per day over flat terrain with lots of stops. The trip includes a visit to Rotterdam, Baltimore's sister city. This is the most bike-friendly country in the world - on this trip, you'll see firsthand how bicycling is integrated into everyday life and culture in the Netherlands. We're hoping to inspire our participants when they come back to Baltimore.

More info: http://www.baltimorerotterdam.org/bike/

I'm in NYC now and I have no problems biking around New York (out side the occasional driver who thinks this is true.) There's lots of bike lanes here so they would be a real waste is bicycling was illegal..

Nov-26-10 01:16 pm
There is growing opposition to bike lanes in New York City
Category: Social
Forum: Advocacy

Basically bicycling advocates put forth any argument that is going to sell the desired treatment to the locals. I'll note the bike lane on Fort Ave was successfully eliminated by the local residents (not that it mattered much to the bikeability of the road) but the narrow travel lanes stayed as a general safety improvement (they slow the general traffic down.) So bikes lanes are just one of many treatments used to justify narrowing travel lanes. The justification of  "slowing down traffic" in and of itself does not create conflict, that is just an unconscious effect of having narrower travel lanes.

@Steve there is a reason why Maryland has the 4th highest pedestrian fatality rate and our bike modal share is in the gutter.  Traffic law enforcement is essentially non existent. Michael Jackson the Director of Bicycle and Pedestrian Access is in the process of producing police training videos (though I'm a bit disappointed I'm not part of the process of developing content but still it should be helpful.) Additionally we have been involved in improving guidance to motorists:

http://www.baltimorespokes.org/article. … 6001608737
http://www.mva.maryland.gov/Driver-Safe … efault.htm

Aug-03-10 12:26 pm
Category: Social
Forum: Advocacy

Asking us to avoid the main entrance is one thing, prohibiting us on using the main entrance is another. I personally have mixed fillings, I could argue that a congested entrance with police presence would be safer for cyclists as bikes and slow speed cars mix well together and for using Old Hanover I would be concerned about cars speeding up past the main entrance and the limited sight distance caused by the bridge would make it more dangerous for cyclists making a left but the sight lines for the main entrance is not that amazing either but car speeds should be more reasonable.

So if the club feels the alt route is fine a letter clarifying (to the police contact and cc the County Exec (who is pro cycling)) that we will RECOMMEND that cyclists avoid the main entrance on returning but hopes that the police will not turn cyclists away from the main entrance if they arrive by mistake or through lack of being informed as a few cyclists using the main entrance should not be that big of a deal.

If the club feels the regular route is safer we could mount a protest. As far as legality, Parks can essentially do what they want, but if they increases the dangers for cyclists they do open themselves up to liability issues (i.e. If cars get a police officer directing traffic and we don't +  my issues that I noted above could be very bad for the Park Service/Police.

Just some thoughts.

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