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Thanks Cindy!
Too cold for a ride, but the lunch would have been OK.

Apr-13-15 07:58 pm
We were not allowed under the rail bridge at Patapsco Valley State Park due to falling masonary.
Category: Social
Forum: Ride Reports

Here is the route:
https://connect.garmin.com/activity/745889959

You can see the turn around we had to do at Patapsco Valley State Park. Mary also had to re-route the ride around the closed portion of Race Rd.

Good ride, thanks Mary!

Steve

I was able to get to the website, and is has been updated within the last month. I used to ride with them 1989 to 1997. Last Tailwind newsletter is from Jan 2012.

http://www.annapolisbicycleclub.org/

Steve Johnson, Millersville, MD

I was able to get to the website, and is has been updated within the last month. I used to ride with them 1989 to 1997. Last Tailwind newsletter is from Jan 2012.

http://www.annapolisbicycleclub.org/

Steve Johnson, Millersville, MD

Jul-13-10 05:54 pm
Category: Technical

Anybody know where I can get a steel frame bead blasted?

Steve

Jul-05-10 07:52 am
insights about a wheel coming out of true?
Category: Technical

Stuart, the Bike Tech website does balance several factors, and for the strong recreational rider and high mileage unsupported rider, durability is a likely a prime consideration. Manufactured wheels are strong and expensive, and for most casual riders probably too expensive. Low spoke manufactured wheels have high spoke tension, and the rims are stronger. It does take some skill and time to get good tension into hand built, or shop built wheels. Most kids working in bike shops get good, after awhile. (How many learning wheels go out the door?)
On new bikes, I have had good luck with working over the stock wheels to get more life out of them. But at 220lbs, 32h machine built wheels do not last. I bought a Trek XO-1 cyclocross bike in 2003 and ran 28mm tires on it. Rear wheel lasted one season, with constant touching up. Built up a 36h Ultegra, and have not had problem since. If I weighed 170lbs, doubt I would have these problems.
Bottom line from the original post, I don't expect much from OEM wheels. It takes awhile for any rider to get a bike dialed in for their style of riding, and it is a bummer to have a ride ruined because of a borked wheel on a new bike. Steve

Jul-04-10 11:11 pm
insights about a wheel coming out of true?
Category: Technical

It is hard to say why this would happen, without having the wheel in hand. I happen to agree with Sheldon Brown in this section "How Many Spokes?"
http://www.sheldonbrown.com/wheelbuild.html#spokes
Most bikes come with machine built wheels. After lacing, the four final adjustments are true, dish, roundness and tension. Tension is important in determining wheel strength and longevity.
Rules of thumb I operate by on on  rear wheels are properly built 32h are OK for 175lbs and below, over 175lbs should go for 36h 700c wheels. 26" mountain bike wheels are OK with 32h rears most of the time. 32H 700c fixed gear rear wheels are generally OK, as long as the wheel is close to symmetrical.
I am in trouble already, but consider this. A 195lb person buys a bike with a 700c 32h rear wheel. The bike is actually used, and after a couple of months of use with a couple of post purchase free adjustments the wheel will not stay true. (The free tune ups actually introduce uneven tension.) The wheel might get replaced by the dealer, or the customer is sold on a manufactured (boutique) wheel. Or better for the shop, a matching wheelset. One thing you will notice about these wheels is, strong rims combined with a few tight spokes. Shop does not have to deal with having mechanic who know how to build wheels, and can sell more product.
Not that this is bad, bike industry profit margins are so low, this is survival. After the frame, wheels are generally the most expensive component.
Each rider has to learn what works for them. OEM wheels generally do not last more than one season for heavier riders. Could be also that the OEM wheel did not have enough tension?

Steve

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